Category Archives: Medical Myths

Our Precious Antibiotics

(c) Gage Skidmore

Just a day after reading about a woman in Nevada who died from a bacterial infection resistant to EVERY SINGLE antibiotic, I discovered that my sister had just finished a course of antibiotics for an upper respiratory infection known as pharyngitis.  Not all that interesting until you consider that my sister had strep test-negative pharyngitis, meaning not caused by the bacteria Streptococcus.  As my palm smacked my forehead in disbelief and I attempted to explain why taking antibiotics might not have been a great idea, I said to myself, “gosh darn it Heather, you’ve got a blog, go blog.” Continue reading Our Precious Antibiotics

Hard knocks on science

It’s that time of year again!  Crisp air, the start of a new school year, a hint of red in the trees, and the beginning of the NFL season–this is undoubtedly my favorite time of year.fall

This NFL season should be full of intrigue.  Will Ezekiel Elliot plow over all front lines?  Will Jim Caldwell, Mike McCoy, and Gus Bradley still have their jobs at the end of the season?  Will any AFC East team dethrone the 4-game Bradyless Patriots?  Will Colin Kaepernick’s stance–or lack thereof–result in a season-long seat on the bench?  Will mermaids rise from the ocean to cheer William Hayes and the newly relocated LA Rams?

I bet you thought this piece was going to be about concussions.  Although that is an ever-present issue for football players, what I really want to discuss is Rams defensive end William Hayes’ anti-science diatribe on the HBO show Hard Knocks. Continue reading Hard knocks on science

Protecting kids who can’t be vaccinated

unvax kidw PIDD

It’s no secret that I’m an unabashed and staunch supporter of vaccines.  Man’s most influential medical accomplishments: vaccines, antibiotics, and water purification have all contributed to lengthening human life by reducing infectious disease.  The public health implications of vaccination aren’t questioned–epidemiological data clearly show that vaccines work. Continue reading Protecting kids who can’t be vaccinated